How to Raise Hardy Biennials

Many of the flowerings bedding subjects are hardy biennials. To raise these plants, there are two ways that depend on their style of growth. The easily raised in drills in open ground are the Sweet Williams and Wallflowers while polyanthus, pansies and forget-me-nots are best grown in pots or trays. All of them are sown during the middle of summer with the aim to produce plants that are strong bear the winter.

The best raised plants in open gardens are usually sown in surfaces with low drills in a nursery. This is not an exclusive part of garden that is divided for producing young plants but is an edge of a vegetable area. If this is intended to be done with wall flowers, then they have to be included in the section that is reserved for sprouts, cauliflowers and cabbages.

HARDY BIENNIALS How to Raise Hardy Biennials

Before the seeds are sown, the open drills have to be watered and it must be ensured that the soil is completely moistened. Then the seed can be thinly distributed along with the base of the drill and filled. In case the weather is dry, the drill should be watered again. Within a few days, seedlings of wallflowers will appear and be ready to dust them with derris dust. It is a safety measure against insects like flea beetle.

The open ground plants can be transferred to their ultimate places at any time once the summer bedding have been cleared. It is not easy to establish flowering bedding subjects after the middle of autumn. If the season remains, remove the summer bedding and the soil prepared. For the success of these subjects, sufficient soil preparation is important although fresh manure is not needed. Bonemeal which is a slow release fertilizer applied before planting will help in ensuring the success of many of the spring flowers.

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