How to Get Started with Home Improvement

You might have any number of reasons for wanting to add space to your house. In the late 19th Century, Mrs. Sarah Winchester (of the riflemaker’s family) became convinced that she would not die as long as she continued to build onto her house. She started with eight rooms and finished with 160, $5 ½  million later. Your reasons are likely to be more conventional than Mrs. Winchester’s (who did, by the way, die).

You may need more space because your family has grown. You may need an office so you can work at home. You may want a special kind of room – a game room, a studio, or a music room. You might want to take better advantage of a view or of the sunlight. And, for one reason or another, you’ve decided that you don’t want to buy a new home to get additional room.

Home Improvement How to Get Started with Home Improvement

After determining that they need more space, some families have gone hunting for houses that satisfy their needs more suitable than their present ones and have found nothing they like. Only then have they decided that adding on is the best solution. Others may be reluctant to leave behind their present neighborhoods, friends, schools, or recreational facilities just to get into a bigger house. Still others just can’t afford to build or buy a new home, and are forced by circumstance to stay put.

To give you a general idea of what’s involved in adding on; we’ve outlined the major tasks that need to be done – each point on the list is discussed in detail. The three outlines describe three different situations. One enumerates what you’ll need to do if you design and build the addition yourself; another lists your tasks if you’ll be working with an architect who will design the addition and oversee construction; the third tells what you’ll need to do if you work with a contractor who will turn your ideas into a design and then do the building.

Of course, each of these three situations contains countless variables. For instance, you might have an architect draw up the plans and then supervise the construction yourself; or you might do your own plans, have them drafted professionally, and then turn the construction over to a contractor. The outlines there are intended as general descriptions rather than exhaustively details ones; your particular circumstances will determine what tasks you do, in which order, and how the work is divided among you and the various people who work for you on the project.

Doing it all yourself: Though the following list is not all inclusive, it will serve as a guide to the formidable array of tasks you’ll face if you’re going to do your own addition from start to finish.

  • Determine all the purposes you want the new room(s) to serve.
  • Study your house and property, making interior and exterior scale drawings.
  • Check your property title for deed restrictions and easements.
  • Make preliminary sketches of the new addition.
  • Take Sketches to the local building department to learn if the proposed addition violates the building code or zoning restrictions.
  • Prepare final plans of the proposed addition.
  • Get necessary permits from the building inspector’s office.
  • List all the materials you’ll need, then go to supplies and price them.
  • Arrange for financing the addition.
  • Arrange for worker’s compensation insurance and withholding tax if necessary.
  • Purchase materials and begin construction.
  • Arrange for the building inspector to check various stages of work at appropriate times.

If you hire an architect or building designer to design the structure and monitor construction, you shorten the list considerable; of course, you also increase the cost of the project.

Using an architect or building designer: Three of the jobs listed below are optional. Some home-owners prefer to let the architect do them; others do them personally so they work in a more informed way with the architect or designer.

  • Determine all the purposes you want the new room(s) to server (optional).
  • Study your house and property, making interior and exterior scale drawings (optional).
  • Check your property title for deed restrictions and easements.
  • Make preliminary sketches of the new addition (optional).
  • Choose an architect.
  • After you and your architect agree on final plans, he or she will arrange for bids on the project, advise you on the hiring of a contractor, and monitor the project through the completion.
  • Arrange for financing.

Working with a contractor: The third alternative, one many homeowners use, involves your working with a contractor to design an addition, and also your doing some of the labor. The contractor’s design won’t be nearly as expensive as an architect’s, and if you intend your addition to be simple and straightforward you may see little reason to engage and architect or building designer. Doing some of the labor yourself will also save you money.

Home Improvement 5 How to Get Started with Home Improvement

  • Determine all the purposes you want the new room(s) to serve (optional).
  • Study your house and property, making interior and exterior scale drawings (optional).
  • Check your property title for deed restrictions and easements.
  • Make preliminary sketches of the new addition (optional).
  • Choose a contractor.
  • Work with the contractor to design the addition and draw up all specifications.
  • Arrange for financing.
  • Contractor will build the addition, but your contract will state what labor you are to do.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Powered by WordPress | Maintained by: Expert How | Thanks to Mega HowTo